York Minster at Night

I have a few slightly different compositions of this same scene from this one evening. Although I have one version that I finished about a year ago, I came across this recently and thought I’d go back to see if I could come up with something different. As it happens, the end result isn’t that different, but I think it was still worth the time.

I said there were a few different compositions of this scene. Actually, they are all very similar, as there was a building site just out of frame to the left, and the tree above meant I couldn’t move too far back as that became too prominent. I felt this evening, apart from producing a few decent photos, was very useful in helping me understand composition and how best to position the camera; essential traits for photography!

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Advertisements

Two Towers

The towers on the front of York Minster, rising next to a fluffy, small white cloud. I think the trick of a lot of landscape photography is to capture those small, fleeting moments, such as when a cloud passes by some monument or other, or when the light hits just a small part of a wider landscape. To get that kind of shot, you have to be alert to everything around you, as well as being prepared for a lot of waiting. Of course, if you’re out with your camera for long enough, you will eventually just get lucky, as I did with this shot.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

York Minster Again

Another view of York Minster, but this time from the side and looking almost straight up with a wide-angle lens. I find that when shooting architecture like this, overhead branches can be very helpful as framing devices. They fill up empty space and direct the eye back to the building. It also seems to help put the building in context against the natural world.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

The Shambles

The street known as ‘The Shambles’ in York. This street is the oldest in the city of York I believe. I’m not entirely sure how old exactly, but it must be in the region of 400-500 years old. Originally, it was where the butchers sold meat from, hence the large ground floor windows to display their wares. Of course, this would have been long before refrigeration, so raw meat hanging in every window would have made it a pretty unpleasant place to be. Now it is very much a place to cater to tourists, but luckily still has that higgledy-piggeldy sense of architecture!

A street in the city of York

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

A cold Autumn evening in the Museum Gardens in York, UK. The ruins seen here are, I believe, from an abbey that dates to around the 11th Century, if not earlier. It was in use for several hundred years before the reformation under Henry VIII that eventually caused it to cease being used and fall into ruin. It’s strange to think that this is now in the centre of a fairly major city, and that when it was built and even when it stopped being used it probably would have been surrounded by rural countryside. It’s interesting that ruins seem to be one of those few things that survive the expansion of a city, whilst perfectly habitable buildings are knocked down and replaced.

A View of a Ruined Abbey in the Museum Gardens, York

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

York Minster Details

On acquiring my 100 mm macro lens, one of the first uses I put it to was taking details of various buildings. In this case, there are several of York Minster, taken just as the sun is setting. This provided a very delicate light that isn’t present at any other time of the day, but also tested my ability to hand hold the lens in relatively dark conditions without gathering any camera shake. Turning the ISO up helped, and I was able to grab a number of shots with relative ease. It’s surprising that, until you begin to look at these details through a camera, you just don’t know that they even exist.

A detail of York Minster

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

 

A detail of York Minster

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

 

A detail of York Minster

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Streetlighting

Streetlights outside the a place I used to live in in York. These streetlights always seemed perfectly positioned. All I had to do was wait for the right weather conditions. In this case it was a cloudy sunset, but I actually have pictures from a number of different days and times of year. Although it may not be one of my best photos, it does show that you can get a decent picture anywhere. Just because you are stuck indoors does not mean that you can put the camera away and make excuses.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Barbed

The setting sun behind a wall of barbed wire. Before taking this photo, I had intended to shoot landscapes, but as I had not been to this location before, I wasn’t sure what I would find. As it turned out, there was not the kind of interesting shot that I wanted here, so as the sun began to set, I turned my attention to other, smaller details of the landscape.

On following a track to a hidden gate, I came across this fence strung with barbed wire across the top. Fortunately, this was near the summit of a small hill, giving me views across the city of York, and an uninterrupted view to the horizon. From there, it was just a matter of exploring the small details to get to this image. I think this is a good example of why you should always maintain an open mind as a photographer. Sometimes it is those small, unplanned moments that can give the most unexpected, interesting results.

Sunset seen through a barbed wire fence

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Museum Field II

Sunset over the museum gardens in York, UK. Another version of the same sunset seen in another picture, but from further back. It always amazes me how the light changes as the sun gets closer to the horizon. What would otherwise be a dull, flat scene becomes something more, entirely because of the light.

Three shot HDR, tripod mounted.
Processed in Photomatix Pro 4 and Photoshop CS4.

Sunset in Autumn

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Benches

Stormy skies over the walls of the city of York. Although the weather looks pretty extreme in this photo, it never actually managed to rain or do any worse than what you see. I had to get this shot very quickly, as access to the city walls is closed at dusk every evening. As I was setting up the tripod, I saw a man wearing a florescent jacket heading towards me to clear the last remaining people towards the exits. Perhaps I would have changed the composition if I had had more time, but overall I think it works quite well.

Three benches under a stormy sky

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Blog at WordPress.com.