Seagulls

Another roof, but taken in the daytime next to the sea. I like trying to spot these abstract compositions when out and about as it can provide something a bit different and a bit unexpected. This shot was converted to black and white and split-toned to help bring some contrast to the photo, but also to smooth the transition between the sea and the building.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

St. Trinity’s Church II

A slightly different take on a similar shot that was taken recently. Usually, I seem to shoot a lot of landscapes in a vertical format. The ratio of horizontal to vertical for all the photos in my collection isn’t that far off 50:50, but it’s enough that clearly I must be drawn more to this kind of shot. Unfortunately, landscape format photos work much better on the web, because almost all computer screens are also landscape. With the portrait format, you often have to scroll down to view the entire photo, which can be quite annoying. Now that I’ve recognised my propensity to shoot like this though, I’m intending to try more photos in landscape, hopefully giving a more internet-friendly result.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Two Towers

The towers on the front of York Minster, rising next to a fluffy, small white cloud. I think the trick of a lot of landscape photography is to capture those small, fleeting moments, such as when a cloud passes by some monument or other, or when the light hits just a small part of a wider landscape. To get that kind of shot, you have to be alert to everything around you, as well as being prepared for a lot of waiting. Of course, if you’re out with your camera for long enough, you will eventually just get lucky, as I did with this shot.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

York Minster Again

Another view of York Minster, but this time from the side and looking almost straight up with a wide-angle lens. I find that when shooting architecture like this, overhead branches can be very helpful as framing devices. They fill up empty space and direct the eye back to the building. It also seems to help put the building in context against the natural world.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Castle Lodge

A more closeup shot of the scene from last week. Having a wall full of bricked up windows like this seems to work well with a bit of a stormy sky. It feels a little bit like something from one of those ghost train rides you get at theme parks, if a little less fake.

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

A more closeup shot of the scene from last week.

Having a wall full of bricked up windows like this

seems to work well with a bit of a stormy sky. It feels a

little bit like something from one of those ghost train

rides you get at theme parks, if a little less fake.

 

The Blank Wall

All six of the side windows of this old Georgian house have been bricked up. Possibly because of the window tax that came in around the period this was built that charged the occupants based on the number of windows in their house, or possibly because of their view over a footpath and cemetery.

Whatever the reason, this still seemed quite a fascinating building up close because of its blankness, and was still worth a  shot even though I had to hand-hold the camera.

A side view of a building

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

General Cemetery

This is a former chapel that has long been abandoned. The roof has gone and the doors are now barred so you can’t get in. This building is now almost impossible to see until you get right on top of it; it’s been so long neglected that there are trees and undergrowth blocking it from sight, as well as modern buildings surrounding it. As far as I could tell, this one part of the cemetery wasn’t alone in being neglected. Generally, I find graveyards can be places quite full of photos. They usually have a lot of interesting wildlife and architecture, as well as being deserted, and are always well worth at least a quick look.

Wisbech General Cemetery

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

York Minster Details

On acquiring my 100 mm macro lens, one of the first uses I put it to was taking details of various buildings. In this case, there are several of York Minster, taken just as the sun is setting. This provided a very delicate light that isn’t present at any other time of the day, but also tested my ability to hand hold the lens in relatively dark conditions without gathering any camera shake. Turning the ISO up helped, and I was able to grab a number of shots with relative ease. It’s surprising that, until you begin to look at these details through a camera, you just don’t know that they even exist.

A detail of York Minster

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

 

A detail of York Minster

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

 

A detail of York Minster

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

Union Place

A Georgian terrace of houses during the early morning. This was taken on a morning walkabout, where I had no real intention of getting any decent pictures. As such, I had no taken my tripod, and had to shoot hand-held. I always find this kind of Georgian architecture quite interesting to photograph. The old bricks and cobbled streets make it feel as though you’ve stepped back in time (apart from the modern car of course!).

A Georgian terrace of houses

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

In the Evening

The front of York Minster taken at night. This is probably the most photogenic side of York Minster, and is certainly the most photographed. Although this isn’t a particularly original photo, I thought having a starburst effect from the streelights added something to the image that made it at least a bit different.

Unfortunately, the three exposures I took from -2 to +2 of exposure compensation weren’t quite enough to get all the detail in the building, thanks to the varying quality of the spotlights lighting it up. In particular, some areas of the top half were so bright, even on the darkest exposure, that it was difficult to find the detail to bring it back. I’ll know in future that apparently uniform spotlights require a bit more exposure range.

The front facade of York Minster

by Tim Daniels - lapseoftheshutter.com

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